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Undergraduate Module Descriptor

PHL3001: Phenomenology

This module descriptor refers to the 2018/9 academic year.

Module Aims

The aim of this module is to introduce you to the place of phenomenology in the history of philosophy. Furthermore, the module aims to critically explore and investigate the challenges associated with the practice and method of phenomenology and how phenomenology sits in relation to other leading philosophical schools of thought such as metaphyscis, existentialism, naturalism and empiricism. In addition, the module aims to encourage you to be able to reflect phenomenologically about your own lived expeirence and to explore the contemporary relevance of the phenomenolgical approach to a variety of topics and disciplines. 

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)

This module's assessment will evaluate your achievement of the ILOs listed here – you will see reference to these ILO numbers in the details of the assessment for this module.

On successfully completing the programme you will be able to:
Module-Specific Skills1. Identify and cogently discuss the key methods, questions, themes and topics within the phenomenological tradition and be able to critically compare this approach with other philosophical methods and traditions.
2. Critically distinguish and evaluate various approaches to phenomenology, and related critiques, within the 20th century with emphasis on approaches such as applied phenomenology, feminist phenomenology and the phenomenological methods of the social sciences.
Discipline-Specific Skills3. Demonstrate a high level of understanding of the interrelation between theories, values and lived experience, with particular focus on embodiment, perception and cognition.
4. Engage in in-depth study of a text through detailed reading and analysis
Personal and Key Skills5. Demonstrate a significantly expanded philosophical vocabulary and understanding with respect to key ideas in twentieth century European philosophy and how this relates to philosophical approaches arising from the Anglo-Analytic tradition
6. Conduct research independently engaging with complex ideas and problems while developing original research insights.
7. Engage in complex and high level argumentation both orally and through writing.